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has dogged our economy or the last few years, is that no one wants us to go back to 110% mortgages that we had during the boom times, but weo need to make available to young people the chance that both earning decent salary to be able to buy a case of flood or a decent house th a mortgage that doesn't require a massive deposit. that hasn't been possible for people in recent years and i ink the bank of england move on funding for landings scheme from 80 billion pounds is now going through to the mortgage market and making available lower mortgages at a decent a long-term rate. and that's great. >> thank you, sir. [shouting] [laughter] >> further to the exchange to the leader of the opposition earlier, can ask the prime minister if he will tell the house whether he will personally benefit from the millionaires tax cut, to be introduced in april? >> i will pay all the taxes that are due in the proper way. but the point i would make to him -- [shouting] the point i would make to him is that all the years he sat on this side of the house there was a top rated tax that was lower than the
more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&p says recent policies could reflat japan's economy. but the government's books will continue to be weighed down by heavy debt. that's even if plans go ahead to raise a sales tax. there's a one in three chance of a downgrade this fiscal year. this is as the japanese prime minister shinzo abe says he will consider changing the bank's mandate. he didn't comment on current policy. all this as investors determine who will become the bank of japan's next governor. front runners for the post include former bank of japan deputy governor and the head of the asian development bank harikahiko tura. >> we did catch up with taro at a meeting this weekend in moscow. the next boj governor was covered, but the first question, whether mr. aso thought the g-20 communique was an endorsement of japan's domestic stimulus plan. >> japan has repeatedly tried to explain that japanese policies are taken to overcome deflation and by all means, these are measures to overcome deflation as well as the recession. that's what is being said in the second paragraph o
. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> the president says the economy is improving, but we have to do better. he says republicans don't have a clue, and that austerity is not the answer. he says it is time to educate our children and rebuild our infrastructure. the president's fourth state of the union. how do we pay the bill? >> nothing i am proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. >> the president offered more of the same -- higher taxes and more stimulus spending. >> the president wants congress to come up with $40 billion to improve infrastructure, wants to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour, wants a new energy bill similar to cap-and-trade, wants preschool for every 4-year-old in the nation, tax reform, gun control, citizenship for undocumented immigrants. what are his chances, charles? >> approximately zero. he is talking as if we have a huge surplus so we can start spending all over again inaugural address was the philosophical statement of what i call this left-liberalism, the state of the union address is the programmat
if sequestration happens? do you think the economy slows down? >> well, it will slow -- by all estimates, it will slow the economy down somewhat. there are differences among economists as to how much. but it will, of course, be contractionary and therefore it will slow growth, but there are a number of other things that are going on in economy that are pro-growth, so it will have a negative impact but there are other pro-growth elements which can be very helpful. >> it sounds like you're not that worried. >> i am worried because it does cause concern that we can't agree on the kinds of rational policies to deal with our problems and we have to revert to something that no one really wants, but they can't reach an agreement on something positive to avoid this kind of thing. >> the good news is that this economy is growing, the u.s. economy. >> i think the u.s. economy is recovering. the job is recovering. the energy boom is helpful. the housing market has bottomed out and beginning to pick up. balance sheets, consumer balance sheetsz, business balance sheets are doing well and exports are
diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial charges facing the economies of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to m
these markets and the economy is headed, well, we will be talking with and welcome to our own rick adonis, senior u.s. economist for deutsche bank security. good to have you here. your year. i mean, we have people walking around with long faces. all parts of the country because they're unemployed. the economy is contracting. and they just don't understand how nice it is to be on wall street. >> well, it is chilly down on wall street. i assure you. but we are seeing some positive signs in the economy. so, yes of the fourth quarter did not look so great. the best top-level gdp number. but when you look beneath the surface we see some important undercurrents. does green shoots cut consumer spending. lou: seeing that come back. >> consumer spending is picking up. the investment which had been contracting. nav is picking up again. the housing market is picking up. but the domestic economy looks dece. it needs time to run until that an employer rate is down, but it increasingly looks like we are building some momentum. lou: you know, i really am. and i am delighted to see your optimism and to h
in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more ability and the possibility to work with us, iterate in the process, rather than what we often see as we call the waterfall, take-it-or- leave-it. flexibility and agility is what is most important. >> mayor lee? >> i have always thought of our city as being the gateway to the rest of the world. i have often talked, with companies, i want to be with you when you turn the corner. we want to be the city that treats international markets for your products. i do not know if you know this but we have 70 counsel general offices in san francisco, the highest number outside of washington, d.c. we want to make sure that our companies know we are not just in it for san francisco, the region. we have to tap inter
bank. and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are, a fidelity ira has a wide array of choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello, everyone. you are watching "bbc news." hopes for a great partnership in the 21st century, david cameron arrived in the hopes for it -- arrived for the beginning of a three day tour. >> britain is one of the largest investors in india. i think the basis for that special relationship is there. >> back in town, hugo chavez announces his plans for the future of the country after cance
idea. the effects on the economy is clear. the economic recovery is being held back by washington. goldman sachs chief u.s. economist out with a new report, saying that the economy will continue to go well below its potential. most consumers probably weren't aware of the hit to their disposable income until they receive their mid-january paycheck. one republican pollster in a new report rights that we have entered a new phase for the dysfunction and paralysis in washington is having a significant impact on how consumers feel about the overall state of the economy and their personal financial situation. the drop in consumer confidence, he says, is directly related to a lack of competence in our current political leaders. consumer confidence has taken a hit, a big one since post-world war ii history. already there is evidence of a slowdown in consumer spending. reports that wal-mart had its worst start to its month in seven years. the payroll tax hikes may be starting to bite. gas prices are up 51 cents in the last two months. prices are up every single day since the middle of janua
on products. he also discusses the british economy and the recent european union budget. this is just over 30 minutes. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> the prime minister. >> thank you, mr. spear. this morning i had meetings with minister colleagues and others, ur.addition to buy duties in >> myconstituent, the constable, is beg buried this afternn after having been killed on duty. i'm sure the whole house will join me in expressing sympathy to her family and also acknowledge her dedicated service. >> here, here. >> the horsemeat scandal has not only sears undermined confidence in the safety of the food we eat that threatens every successful meat industry. can the prime minister assure me that this government will relentlessly follow every lead and give each an every guilty person or business responsible for any criminal or fraudulent act has been caught, exposed, prosecuted, and then expelled from ever again having any part in the uk food industry? >> i fully support what the honorable gentleman has said, but first of all let me join him in praising the constable. she died going about her job,
been rated since the inquiry began last month he also discusses the european economy and the budget code. this is just over 30 minutes >> mr. speaker? the horse meat scandal has undermined confidence in the safety of the food we eat, but threatens a very successful wheat industry. can the prime minister assured me that this government will follow every lead until each individual person or business responsible for any criminal or fraudulent act has been caught, exposed, prosecuted, and then expelled from ever again having any part in the u.k. food industry >> i fully support what the honorable gentleman said. let me join me in praising this constable. she kept people sit in the communities that she is head of a. i would join him in sending my deepest condolences along with everybody else to her colleagues and loved ones. on the issue of this appalling situation where people buying beets -- beef products in supermarkets find out that could be coarse meat, but me say this -- but me bring the house up-to- date. on the 15th of january, the irish authorities identified problems in a numbe
that there is an average wage that is probably twice the national average. they have high leverage in the economy. there is going to be an unintended consequence, unfortunately, if there is not a deal made in 11 days. ashley: would you agree that defense spending needs to be reformed? it may be the wrong way to do it, but it seems to be the only way. >> the suddenness. in the past, abbott there -- in the past, there was a planned slowdown of an amount of what we are facing here. we have already taken a 12% cut for defense contractors and they are looking at another seven-12% again. ashley: how much does this compromise national security? >> well, clearly, one of the ways that will be cut in and unplanned fashion is to stop paying for discretionary things like language interpreters and servicers, as well as, maintenance and operations. that means we will not be able to deploy our forces overseas. whether it be for military purposes or expeditionary purposes for humanitarian aid. ashley: tom, quickly, they are supposed to give 60 day notices. if these cuts go into effect in 11 days, that will not h
. stuart: tell me the truth. do you think that president obama really values growth for our economy or redistribution of the wealth? >> i think he's far more in the camp of redistribution than growth. and his central campaign theme he made clear was redistributing wealth and he's done it, kept his promise. >> let me read this for you. the congressman henry waxman demands more executive orders from the president. in a letter to the white house, waxman wants the president to issue new regulations on everything from power plants to oil refineries and even household appliances. henry waxman, a member of congress, he wants the president to go around congress with his voice. >> we have the separation of powers in this country. something that's hugely important. with a waxman is recommending and i recognize just waxman represents to me a liberal, too. and i'm against conservative or moderate as liberal. but the idea of president going around congress to get things done, especially when he gets up in his state of the union and says that the sequester is not his work, but the work of congres
in coming years of the baby boomers. do we need to cut it today with the economy still as weak as it is? no, we don't. the idea debt is a problem and manufactured -- chris: everybody get in on this. who gets hurt if we have a situation at the end of this month, march 1, where there's a huge cut in government spending. watch what happens and we lose a lot of pentagon jobs. a lot of people out of work. stop by and stores closed, supporting organizations and some contractors are out of work. who gets blamed, president or republicans in congress? >> in the end i think the president. we americans under this habit of thinking i think the presidents have too much -- deserve too much for a good economy and too much blame for a bad economy. what a president does is pretty important but not as important as sometimes other factors. chris: if we have a shutdown or second recession or something like it, double dip, who gets hurt? >> republicans believe your theory, michael, it's the president. the buck stops with him. fundamentally -- >> chris: he's the one scared of this sequester more than anybody it
are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, talking about the silicon valley, we have the mayor of san francisco. it will come into perspective, that when you have a giant like ibm anchor here in the valley, you are seeing in between companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear j
bank, and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are, a fidelity ira has a wide array of choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." "bbc world news america." i am reporting from washington. celebrations on the street of venezuela of welcome president hugo chavez home. questions about his health remains. david cameron and travels to india to drum up business. in the sky is the limit tonight's big dream series. jessica is overcoming obstacles with amazing passion for life. welcome to our viewers on public televisi
surrounding the economy, dow jones has one of the best january in years. if the dow has a great january, oil prices likely will follow. that is what we're seeing. gasoline prices following. not only that, refineries haven't necessarily switched over to summer blend of gasoline but are preparing to do so for the all-out production will bring, not only that, a job in that as well. sandra: i want to challenge you one thing. he said gasoline prices will track the price of oil, but let's throw out the price of oil and gasoline this year. oil prices up year-to-date 4.1% while gasoline prices are up three times that, more than 14%. so gasoline prices are way outpacing the price of oil. >> that happens from time to time. gasoline prices didn't necessarily go as low as oil prices. this last november. right now a lot of it is a primary bottleneck why prices haven't followed crude oil so closely. we still have that bottleneck in the way causing a spike in gasoline prices, refineries moving production preparing for summer driving season. sandra: the bottom line, oil prices have gone up, we cannot refine
versus capitalism you can achieve success, not be bailed out then this economy creates jobs and allows people to move ahead as abraham lincoln said improve their lot in life. government hurts' opportunities come to keep people in their place and is not a how to create things. free the people. they will do its. [laughter] john: you may kitchen ventilation systems in the kitchen to suck up the bad air but government wants to make your business better so then they will help all of the of the if you focus on 79 pages of regulation, and many manufacturers are very small, it is too abstract it is impossible to read. >> notice of proposed rulemaking subsection 13, a complete missing in action is unintelligible then they try to make your fans used less electricity. so we have a paradox but he wants to regulate us to death so with creativity with the small investments made over a long period of time and government dampens that for the economy. >> keep in mind if you don't succeed in a true free market even if you meet the needs and wants of other people. john: not the caricature of obama that h
a devastating impact on our local economy, not to mention all the individuals and their families out of a job for a time. those concerns have a lot of you pretty upset. our jessica doyle is taking your concerns to congress with a question some local lawmakers didn't seem to want to hear. >> reporter: march 1st could be a very bad day for the region's workforce. without a deal on capitol hill sequestration will force deep federal spending cuts, hundreds of thousands of federal workers and private employees could be furloughed. the threat that one wusa9 viewer -- got one wusa9 viewer so mad she made this proposal. congress should step up to the plate and take one furlough day each week until they actually make some decent decisions about how to make the economy better, so we decided to take her proposal to capitol hill and ask our four local senators would they be willing to accept furloughs if federal workers are forced to. all of the democratic lawmakers have spoken out against sequestration and have expressed their opposition to furloughs for any workers, but none of them answered our speci
of the rich. the problem is, whenever he tries to squeeze more money out of the economy, he is slowing it down. we slowed down in the fourth quarter, and it's not because government spending is going down. government spending is still going at pace and we have plenty of government spending and in fact spent more the fourth quarter last year than the third quarter and spent more than the previous year and never had a real cut in spending in recent history. so i think he's just flat-out wrong. >> chris: but, as a matter -- whether right or wrong, and, you know, it doesn't have anything to do with -- as a matter of practical politics isn't the president putting the republican party in the same spot he successfully put you in during the campaign, he's defending the middle class and you guys are protecting tax breaks for the wealthy? >> right and that is empty and false rhetoric and is our job to explain to the american people, big government doesn't help the poor. big government creates massive debt which causes your prices to rise. your gas price going up, if you make $20,000 a year, and have two
economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world with tools to live in the chewing print with 3-d or even topple dock - we're fashioned ou
to the supply and demand side. the demand suicides has come up from the economy improving. and some tenants have been displaced who have taken up other places there's not layoff a lot on the port to lease. i should say those vacancy rates don't include the buildings we're in today or the vacant land. the other indicator we use is the annual revenues that has been hoover over 4 percent. the bigger story is we've got one account that repeals half of the out standing amount and once we're able to resolve that the delinquent rate will drop. now predictably we lost money in the industrial space storage facilities and parking lot this was due to the america's cup project as well as the displacement where the crews ship term is being built. we need the city to rehe bureaus us dues to some complications has not generated revenue for us however, we're expecting a revenue reimburse time. a lot of those costs have been offset by parking lot meter funds >> good afternoon commissioner this is marilyn i'm from the medical examiner division financial analysts. on the maritime does the revenue is up by 21.4 pe
>> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spre
of the improving economy and the increase in permit activity to help us get to the increased this year, i have discuss thed this with the mayor's budget office. they would prefer that we take this approach to looking at legislation to further increase our surcharge rates. they would look to avoid legislation right now for that purpose and instead rely on the increased in permit activity and the application of cpi to get us to our target. and they realized that if we don't meet our revenue needs, that it is the general fund that will need to bail us out and so it is really the risk that they are taking and they are understand that. i have been also talking about the control tore see if we could set up a rainy day fund or a reserve fund so that if we do close the year with a surplus we could hold on to that money and help us to close the gap that we might experience in the future and looking to see about that and open to that. so my recommendation would be to rely on those improvements in the revenue to get us through the next year and to look again a year from now to see if we need legislation
ministers tell japan and other big missions, no currency wars. if a weaker currency helps their economy, plummet against the dollar and the euro. where's the trade for you? top currency strategist helps you dig for the treasure. are your mutual funds socking you in dividend taxes? a morningstar analyst teaches you how to -- >> countdown starts right now. liz: good afternoon everybody. i'm liz claman. happy president's day. yes, the u.s. markets are closed, but we are open for business. and good thing at that, breaking news in just the last hour and a half, the "wall street journal" reporting that office max and office depot are in talks to merge. sources say the talks are fluid, could still fall apart, but an announcement could come as early as this week. office depot is the bigger of the two with a market value of about 1.3 billion dollars. while office max, about 933 million dollars. both have pretty much skyrocketed over the second half of last year. now, according to sources, the deal is expected to be stock for stock exchange. the possible merger could help the two office supply re
evening to you. $3.99 at this gas station right here. the timing is not good for this. the economy is fragile, and all the money that is going into gas tanks, it would and could be going into instead groceries, maybe a movie out, maybe a dinner out. at gas stations across the country, customers are asking the same question. what could possibly send gas prices up 43 cents in a month? that's an extra $8.60 on a 20-gallon car. in chicago, more than that, up 70 cents in a month to 4.$4.22 gallon. for taxi driver ray hubert, that's real money. >> it digs into my pocket. i pay for my own gas, nobody else pays for it. >> reporter: in los angeles, up 50 cents in a month to $4.28, some stations charging more than $5 a gallon. >> it doesn't make sense. we went to vegas last weekend and the prices were like $1.50 less. >> reporter: were portland to portland, gas prices have risen every day for the last month. >> the rising gasoline prices is extraordinary for this time of year. we usually see this happen as we go into the summer driving season. >> reporter: what's going on? analysts say the r
government is actually capable of doing? i mean, you talk about the economy and jobs. there is, obviously, debate how many jobs have actually been created in the economy. look. you pointed out to apple ceo, tim cook was in the audience in the state of the union. he is sitting on over 171 million dollars in cash at apple. why? because uncertainty in the marketplace. tom friedman writing this morning something that caught my eye. he said you can feel the economy wants to launch but washington is sitting on the national mute button. we the people feel like the children of permanently divorcing parents. how does this sequestered business end? the president said during the campaign the sequester, the word for automatic spending cuts, he said it would not happen. is it going to happen? >> i always read tom friedman he has that good minnesota sensibility. >> you guys stick together. >> we do. the column today i think is continuation of that. frankly, i believe it's a continuation of exactly the plan the president laid out in detail in the state of the union on tuesday night. we have already made
none any ou moneyf the economy he is slowing it down. we slowed down in the fourth quarter. it is not because government spending it going down. government spending is is still going at pace. we petn spen spent more no theh quarter last career than in the nird quarter. we never had a real cut in spending in recent history. i will think he is flat out wrong. >> chris: but does it matter whether it is right or wrong and you know this doesn't have anything to do with politics, as a matter of practical politics isn't the president putting the republican party in the same spot he is successfully put you in during the campaign. he is defending the middle class and you guys are protecting tax breaks for the wealthy. >> right. and that is empty and false rhetoric. it is our job to explain to the american people that big government doesn't help the poor. big government creates massive debt which causes your price to rise. your gas price going up if you make $20,000 a year and have two kids you are poor and when the gas prices go from $3.20 to $3.0 that is president obama doing that
the u.s. economy will grow slowly this year as tax increases and spending cuts offset improvements in the private sector. bruce willis is "a good day to die hard" pulled in $25 million. "identity thief" rant and with a close second, 23.4 million. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ dagen: $101.7 billion over the next ten years. the joint committee think this is the cost of a massive new sales tax to pay for obamacare. elizabeth macdonald is here with the bottom line. explain how this is, ultimately, being passed on. >> it is an excise tax or sales tax. look at this number. $7200. health insurers will pass this on. look at this. joint committee and taxation think that health insurers will pass this on. expect it to hit the insurance, basically, consumer in the form of higher premiums. they estimate 2.5% greater cost. we have two congressmen looking
-mart moms are a great indication what is happening with the economy. making $40,000 a year. living paycheck to paycheck. you have less money than the end of the 2012. it is a concern. it has to put some doubt in your head. david: less money because taxes have gone up. >> pulls into the question what is going on with the market. it has risen so far. is it justified. liz: square that with the value oriented reit, dan horowitz was with us 19 minutes ago, he said, a lot of ainge tore stores are wal-marts, he said that people are flooding in there today. they have done rather well. yes, january was slow but tell me how to square those two together? >> wal-mart what we're seeing a lot of strength in their food, consumeables business. that is good for them. what is that? low margin category. liz: low margin, right. >> they're not seeing a lot of strength in home goods, upper priced items. items you have to think about. put them on the credit card. you have to stretch a little bit. in fact you're seeing weakness there is obviously a negative signal. david: let me get to one of your picks, surprisin
americans. that is strength in numbers, united healthcare. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: in the nine weeks since the schoolhouse shootings in newtown, connecticut, police around the country report hundreds more have been victims of gun violence. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critica
to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we must continue to pre
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
expenditures. we know that the economy has been challenging for the board and the city in general over the last several years and so we are looking for opportunities to reduce the expenses. we did have a clerical staff member leave and held that position for some months open so that we would have salary savings and you met him and he is our new hire. i do think that even though we have an increase in appeal volume, we are going to find some savings in some of the line items that pay for the processing of appeals. the sf government television broadcasting cost and the neighborhood costs will come in lower than what we projected. because those figures are largely based on the higher levels of appeals that we have seen specifically. and even though we are trending up we are not back at our procedure historic levels. i think that we may end the year with an expenditure reduction of about $78,000, and if you back out the shortfall, we should close with about $58,000 on hand. and as far as looking forward for... i am sorry. >> please? >> the new hire, are we going to, i was focused with the surplus i
economy? it was tobacco. these were all drugs. and the first time a lot of these drugs were introduced back to europe, um, people looked at them with revulsion, right? tobacco, it was a bizarre thing. why would you put fire and smoke into your mouth? coffee was thought to be a subversive thing, it was a death penalty offense in many states. for good reason, people would go to t.a.r.p.es, and the only -- taverns, and the only safe thing to drink was alcohol, but with coffee you had to boil the water which made it safe, but it also stimulated people. coffeehouses became revolutionary hotbeds. people started talking politics instead of just getting drunk every night. [laughter] so it was, you know, initially a death penalty offense in many states, and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and, of course, the tobacco fortunes that drove a lot of u.s. and european development. and so long story short, the reason half the world got colonized in some ways is because of a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get it up. so there you have sex, drugs and international relations in a n
that japan economy will finally start to improve. >> reporter: property company officials plan to hold more seminars. they hope to convince more asian investors to buy in japan. potential buyers say one consideration is whether the yen's weakness will continue. they are also watching for signs of pickup in the japanese economy. nhk world, singapore. >>> australia is a nation of immigrants and active in helping refugees. the nation received more than 10,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance every year over the past decade. but the increasing financial burden push the its prime minister to review the generous policy. the move has met with criticism as well as support. it's likely to become a focal point in the upcoming september election to choose federal lawmakers. we have the story from sidney. >> reporter: this refugee from afghanistan, the 19-year-old came to australia by boat in may of 2010 after the taliban killed his brother and sister. the four month journey took him through malaysia and indonesia. then for final week he was packed on to a small vessel with 30 people. he lost
market is one reason americans are feeling better about the economy. consumer sentiment improved in february, but on friday, stocks finished in the weak mix. the dow gapped eight points. it remains this morning below 14,000, starts tomorrow at 13981. the nasdaq was off by 6.5. >>> countries throughout europe are finding more traces of horse meat in the beef supply. millions of burgers and frozen meals have been recalled. tests have discovered horse meat in school meals and hospital food in the uk. it is believed some of the horse meat was mixed in with beef at a french processing plant and then shipped out. >>> and shoe makers around the vat acan -- vatican are getting ready for a boost in business. the catholic church is preparing for the upcoming conclave, which means religious leaders will be looking for new clothes. a tiny area filled with shops just outside the vatican walls, papal tail lowers -- tailors will be busy. three versions of the same robe will be made for a new pope. >> he doesn't shop at target? >> no. he loves his red shoes. >> that was a big deal. >> that is he
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